REDEEMING THE CHAOS

The Least We Could Do – Come and See! Chapter 23
Laurie Christine
Laurie Christine
March 27, 2021

LISTEN TO COME AND SEE! CHAPTER 23THE LEAST WE COULD DO

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Welcome to this special Easter edition of Redeeming the Chaos with Laurie Christine! 

Come and See! 30 Family Bible Stories for Easter

A FAMILY DEVOTIONAL FOR EASTER

For 30 days leading up to Easter, I will be reading to you from my easter devotional book, Come and See! 30 Family Bible Stories for Easter.  

Today, I am reading Come and See! Chapter 23 – THE LEAST WE COULD DO.

Come and See!  invites families of elementary-aged children to experience firsthand the anticipation, the sorrow, the tragedy, the fear, and the ultimate triumph of Jesus’ death and resurrection. 

Through the eyes of six eye witnesses, you will be led on a journey through the busyness of  the streets of Jerusalem, to the despair of Golgotha, and finally to the celebration of the empty grave.

This bookincludes 30 short devotional stories, each with accompanying Scripture references and questions for discussion and imagination.

We are going to be reading one story each day leading up to Easter.  You’re welcome to grab the kids and listen together for your family Bible time.  Or, if you would rather read to your kids on your own, you can DOWNLOAD A FREE COPY OF THE ENTIRE EBOOK HERE.

LISTEN TO COME AND SEE! CHAPTER 23THE LEAST WE COULD DO

READ COME AND SEE! CHAPTER 23 – THE LEAST WE COULD DO

THE LEAST WE COULD DO – Told by Nicodemus, a Pharisee

a secret meeting, come and see chapter 3

“My heart was filled with anger and sadness at the same time. I really didn’t know Jesus that well, but I felt as if we had connected that night we met in secret. This man had spoken life into my soul like no ceremony nor sacrifice was ever able to do.”

NICODEMUS, A PHARISEE

I was anxious to know what had happened to Jesus. Joseph and I cautiously approached Caiaphas, hoping to get news about the crucifixion. After the earthquake and the curtain incident, we didn’t want to arouse the anger of the high priest.  

“So, what’s the news from Golgotha?” I asked casually. “Has the crucifixion proceeded as planned?”  

“Indeed,” replied Caiaphas, with an attitude of finality and triumph in his voice. “I instructed the Roman guards to hurry the process along so that the crucifixion didn’t interfere with the Passover celebrations. They have most likely broken the legs of all the criminals by now. I had to get back to the temple for the Passover ceremonies, so I left the Captain of the Guard in charge of tying up the loose ends.”  

Loose ends? I thought, horrified that he saw the torturous death of an innocent man as nothing more than a business arrangement. Joseph and I looked at each other, and we both knew we had to do something to help.

As soon as Caiaphas was out of earshot, I whispered to Joseph, “What’s going to happen to Jesus’ body? Isn’t there something we can do?” I felt that somehow I was partly responsible for Jesus’ death.

Joseph stroked his beard thoughtfully, and then spoke. “You know, I have a plot of land that I own just outside the city, not far from the Hill of the Skull. There’s an empty cave on the property — I was planning to use it for my own burial place someday…” he paused. “We could make sure Jesus has a proper burial. It’s the least we could do.”  

“I think that’s an excellent idea,” I replied. “We’ll need to get permission from Pilate, though, to take down the body.”  

“I don’t imagine Pilate will care what we do with the body, as long as he doesn’t have to deal with it,” Joseph pointed out. “We should hurry though. The Sabbath will begin soon.”

After receiving permission from Pilate to remove Jesus’ body from the cross, Joseph and I stopped at the marketplace. Joseph bought a long piece of linen cloth to wrap Jesus’ body. Wanting to contribute as well, I purchased seventy-five pounds of perfumed ointment made from myrrh. It was Jewish tradition to wrap a dead body in herbs and oils in order to preserve it and honor the one who had died. 

Joseph and I arrived at the site of the crucifixion, carrying the items we had purchased for Jesus’ burial. As we walked up the hill, I could see Jesus, nailed to the middle cross between the two thieves. My heart leapt into my throat when I saw him. I barely recognized him. Blood poured from the wounds in his hands and feet, and dripped down his face where the crown of thorns had been smashed into his scalp. I could see a gaping wound in his side where the Roman soldiers had punctured his heart, checking to see if he was truly dead. But amazingly, it appeared that his legs had not been broken after all!

My heart was filled with anger and sadness at the same time. I really didn’t know Jesus that well, but I felt as if we had connected that night we met in secret. This man had spoken life into my soul like no ceremony nor sacrifice was ever able to do. I wanted to believe with all my heart that his teachings were true — that he really was the Son of God and that he truly could give me life that never ends. 

As I helped Joseph gently remove Jesus’ body from the cross and lower him to the ground, I felt compassion for the small crowd of Jesus’ followers who lingered nearby. Most of the crowd had already dispersed, eager to get back to their homes and begin their Passover celebrations. But I recognized a few of Jesus’ disciples, as well as a small group of women. What agony they must have been going through. 

Joseph and I wrapped Jesus’ body tightly with the long piece of linen fabric that we had purchased. Carrying the body on a sleeping mat, the two of us began the trek down the hill toward the tomb. I noticed that a few of the women were following us at a distance.


WANT TO GO DEEPER?

DOWNLOAD FAMILY DISCUSSION QUESTIONS AND SCRIPTURE PASSAGES HERE.

“Be strong and courageous, for the Lord your God is with you wherever you go.” 

JOSHUA 1:9

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